Is Bottled Water Damaging My Teeth?

Drinking water is a necessary part of our daily lives, as it helps keep our bodies hydrated and functioning at peak capacity. Most people aged 18 and over need to drink 64 oz, or around eight glasses, of water each day so they can remain fully hydrated. In order to fulfill their water needs, many people are turning to bottled water, rather than tap water, due to its portability, advertised high levels of purification, and convenience. However, drinking only from water bottles may be having an unintended effect on the health of your teeth. For nearly 60 years, communities across the United States have been required to add a controlled amount of Fluoride to all communal water supply. However, water bottling companies have no requirement to add fluoride to their water and may even be removing it during the filtration process. This means that most bottled waters have little to no fluoride in their water, which may be affecting the health of your teeth.

Dr. Gary Bram at Dental Expressions understands that good hydration and dental health are both essential parts of your overall well-being. If you are not receiving daily fluoride, however, you may have increased problems with your teeth that will only worsen with age and time. He is prepared to help you understand the importance fluoride in your life and how to you can ensure your smile is healthy and beautiful for years to come.

Water Fluoridation

Fluoride is a chemical that helps strengthen tooth enamel and remineralize teeth, helping keep them strong and healthy long-term. The American Dental Association indicates that the average adult must ingest four milligrams of fluoride daily to have a noticeably positive effect on tooth health. This data has helped the government determine appropriate levels of fluoride to add to the water supply to ensure that Americans receive an appropriate daily fluoride intake. The water fluoridation project has helped reduce tooth decay across the country, but the effectiveness of this task is declining as water bottle usage has increased. On average, bottled water contains only 0.3 mg of fluoride, meaning you would need to drink over 13 bottles of water each day to receive the recommended daily amount of fluoride. Although the long-term effects of relying on bottled water are not yet wholly apparent, dentists are concerned that many more Americans will be facing increased rates of tooth decay if they do not supplement their fluoride supply.

Contact Dr. Bram

To learn more about the effects of fluoride or to discuss any other dental needs, contact Dr. Bram at (781) 260-6175, today. With the help of a trusted dentist, you can ensure that bottled water is not having a damaging effect on your teeth.